Soaring Above Louisiana’s Coast Shows How We Can Restore It

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Soaring Above Louisiana’s Coast Shows How We Can Restore It

02.23.2021 | Posted by Jacques P. Hebert, Communications Manager, Coastal Resilience and Ecosystems, Environmental Defense Fund

Ben Depp is a New Orleans-based landscape photographer and National Geographic Society Explorer. He has photographed many parts of Louisiana’s coast, capturing with amazing detail the beautiful and haunting details of our disappearing swamps, marshes and barrier islands. Last year, Ben was featured in the nationally-distributed documentary series “Last Call for the Bayou” in the episode, “On a Wing and a Prayer,” which detailed the urgency of the state’s land loss crisis and his unique process for documenting it. I …

Without the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion, the Future for Louisiana’s Barataria Basin is Bleak

02.08.2021 | Posted by Rachel Rhode, Analyst, Coastal Projects and Programs, Environmental Defense Fund

Louisiana’s land loss crisis is dire and will significantly worsen without investments in large-scale coastal restoration and protection projects. Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost 2,000 square miles of coastal wetlands. Without action, the state could lose double that amount — an additional 4,000 square miles of land – in the next 50 years. This future scenario, commonly referred to as Future Without Action (FWOA), underscores why Louisiana has literally no time to lose in constructing coastal projects that can …

CWPPRA Provides Lessons for Applying Adaptive Management Across Louisiana’s Coast

12.22.2020 | By Jarryd Page, Public Interest Law Fellow, Environmental Law Institute (ELI)

Adaptive management has become an important tool for natural resource managers tasked with running complex systems in the face of growing uncertainty. It relies on a framework that continually updates management decisions based on the ongoing monitoring of data. This framework can apply to a variety of projects, including those designed to protect and restore coastal habitat. Louisiana’s massive coastal restoration efforts are a classic example of an elaborate and ever-changing landscape that calls for such an approach. For example, …

Virtual Tour Highlights Importance of Wetlands for Coastal Cities

The Lower 9th Ward Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development (CSED), National Audubon Society, and the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana (CRCL) are proud to release a virtual tour highlighting how a healthy coast is integral to a healthy community. Told through local voices, the tour examines key areas and infrastructure surrounding the Lower 9th Ward that provide protection from damaging winds and water driven by tropical storms and hurricanes. This video is one effort in a series aimed at …

How Social Science can Inform Engineers Working on Coastal Restoration

08.13.2020 | By Anna Cerf, Coastal Social Science Intern, Environmental Defense Fund

Growing up in Minnesota, I loved swimming and kayaking along the Mississippi River. This summer, as part of my EDF internship I learned about life 2,000 miles downriver in Louisiana. To both Minnesota and Louisiana, the Mississippi River is culturally and economically important, but also poses risks that will worsen as climate change progresses. In high school, I remember stuffing and laying sandbags to protect my teacher’s home from flooding ahead of a storm. And storms like those are expected …

Find Out Your Home or Business’s Flood Risk With This Tool

08.06.2020 | By Halle Parker

Living in southeast Louisiana almost certainly means living with water. A new national database has provided us with even more tools to help you determine your home’s flood risk.  The First Street Foundation’s Flood Factor site lets you type in an address and gives you a risk rating scored on a 10-point scale. When I tried out the tool for my New Orleans apartment, it gave my address a four out of 10, or what it called a “Moderate Flood …

We Want Your Grandma’s Famous Oyster Dressing Recipe

07.30.2020 | Posted by Samantha Carter, Outreach Manager, Mississippi River Delta Restoration, National Wildlife Federation

A couple of months ago after we had all been sent home to work remotely and we began adjusting to life in this bizarre new world, I found myself spending more time in my kitchen than ever before. I fell victim to the bread-making craze. I joined a good, old-fashioned recipe exchange email chain to share and receive new recipes from strangers to keep things interesting in the kitchen. I obsessively grew radishes, lettuce, kale, and peppers in my garden, …

Coastal Groups Mourn the Loss of Pioneering Scientist Dr. Sherwood “Woody” Gagliano

The renowned scientist was one of the first to document and alert the world to Louisiana’s coastal land loss crisis Last week, Louisiana’s science and coastal communities lost a great mind and advocate in the fight to address the state’s coastal land loss crisis. Dr. Sherwood “Woody” Gagliano was one of the first Louisiana State University scientists to document that the state was experiencing a net wetland loss at a time when many assumed the coast was gaining land. His …

#LaLeg: How Coastal Issues Fared During This Year’s Session

07.10.2020 | By Emily Vuxton and Cynthia Duet, State Policy

Get Involved! The scoping meetings for the Mid-Breton Sediment Diversion are next week and the Army Corps is looking for your feedback. Be a part of the process, and learn more about how you can get involved! No legislative session is the same, but this session took it a step further. The session also began right as coronavirus cases were on the rise in the U.S. The day the session opened, Louisiana recorded its first COVID-19 case. By week’s end, …

Your Voice is Needed: Why and How to Participate in the Mid-Breton Sediment Diversion Scoping Process

Skip to a section What is ‘Scoping’? Podcast: Scoping Out the Mid-Breton Sediment Diversion How to Participate in Mid-Breton Scoping How to submit your official scoping comments and questions Additional Resources One of the cornerstone projects the State of Louisiana deems most central to the future of the Mississippi River Delta is, after over 35 years of planning, hitting a major milestone. The Mid-Breton Sediment Diversion project is officially in the scoping period, which means the public has an opportunity …

Amid More Frequent Bonnet Carré Spillway Openings, Upriver Diversions Can be a Solution

06.23.2020 | Posted by Devyani Kar, PhD, Coastal Projects and Programs Manager, Environmental Defense Fund

The unprecedented  2019 Mississippi River flood was a stark reminder of the need to rethink the management of our rivers and how we confront a future with more water coming to Louisiana from the rest of the country. In the last five years, the Army Corps has opened the Bonnet Carré Spillway (BCS) five times to relieve pressure on Mississippi River levees that protect one million people in Southeast Louisiana.  To identify actionable solutions to confront this new normal, we …

Black Lives Matter

06.16.2020 | Posted by Black Lives Matter

Restore the Mississippi River Delta stands in opposition to all forms of racism, police brutality and violence against Black people and communities. We share our country’s grief and anger over the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Modesto Reyes and the countless other Black people whose lives have been brutally taken. Anti-Blackness and Anti-Black racism are systemic issues that exist across all facets of American society, including our own coastal restoration efforts in Louisiana. We pledge to fundamentally …

Hurricane Season Has Started. This Coloring Book Can Help Your Family Prepare.

06.01.2020 | Posted by Katie Gruzd, Campaign Manager, Restore the Mississippi River Delta, Environmental Defense Fund

The arrival of June marks the official start of the 2020 hurricane season. Already, the United States has seen two named storms form in the Atlantic Ocean. The National Hurricane Center also predicts that a tropical disturbance in the Gulf of Mexico near Central America will turn into a tropical storm within the next few days.  This year, NOAA predicted another busy hurricane season — a trend that’s only expected to continue — with 13 to 19 named storms between …

New Study Emphasizes Need for Swift Action to Save Louisiana’s Coast

05.29.2020 | Posted by Alisha Renfro, Coastal Scientist, Mississippi River Delta Restoration Program, National Wildlife Federation

A recently published coastal study by Tulane researchers made bold predictions and grabbed headlines across the country. Of course, there’s more to a story than its headline, so we wanted to understand what this meant for the future of Louisiana’s coast and ongoing restoration efforts. The study, published last week, reached an all too familiar conclusion — if things continue as they are, Louisiana’s marshes will drown, endangering our ability to continue to live in New Orleans or anywhere south …

It’s Time to Restore the Chandeleur Islands

05.11.2020 | Posted by John Lopez, Director, Coasts & Community, Pontchartrain Conservancy

Ten years after the BP oil disaster, one of the most impacted wildlife areas has yet to receive recovery funding.  The Chandeleur Islands are the Gulf Coast’s most pristine barrier islands, even after the assault of oil in 2010. Established in 1904 as the second national wildlife refuge in the country by the godfather of conservation, President Teddy Roosevelt, the islands have never had a paved road or permanent settlement.  Recreational fishers visit the island after crossing a large bay, …